‘If only pain was a visible thing…’

I don’t know why, but that quote left me thinking about something that I experienced a long time ago.

It was back in the day when I was actively participating in Taekwondo classes. For the most part, looking back, I didn’t learn anything useful except finding out about new creative ways to stretch the limbs and extremities of my body in very unpleasant positions. I probably benefitted more from this than I care to admit. Especially since I after a while became the ‘stretchiest’ Taekwondo student out of the people who joined at the same that I did.

I don’t know if that’s worth bragging about.

I just know I gained a reputation for having very stretchy limbs.

Be that as it may.

Anyway, one day I hurt my foot. Badly. I forgot exactly how it played out, but I think I cut myself on the inside of my foot — the side of the foot that I’m walking on. I don’t know if it has a certain name I should use. It probably has, but I’m too lazy to find out if does for the time being.

Anyway, so after a while a bruise developed, which soon turned into a blister.

And that blister, unlike any other blister I’ve ever had, grew and became enormous. Like a ball that was under development. It seemed like it would grow every single day. And every day, it hurt more and more walking on it. Since I lived about 20 minutes or so by foot from school, it meant I had to calculate extra time to get to class. What used to take me 20 minutes now took me a good 40 minutes or so. At least. I was limping like someone who’d broken their foot or sprained their ankle.

It was horrible.

In fact, it got so bad that I eventually had to walk home from class because of the pain. I managed to get an appointment with a doctor and got him to take a look at the blister. The doctor told me to buy some creme, and rub it on the blister. And also to take at least two daily foot baths. What I, under no circumstances couldn’t do was to pop the blister. That would make it even worse. I had to endure the pain and the blister would eventually recede and dry out on its own.

And so I did.

I think I spent a good week or so following the doctor’s orders.

Took two daily foot baths.

Rubbed the blister with the creme I’d bought.

Limped back and forth to and fro school. Of course, as my foot was all messed up, I couldn’t work out. So I was pretty much left to stare in the wall for most of the time.

Not a fun time, indeed.

And, with every day, the pain just worsened. In fact, I seem to remember the blister just growing and growing. Not receding. But growing.

How was this going to end?

Well, about one week in, I did exactly what the doctor told me *not* to do.

Not on purpose, but on accident.

It was a cold winter’s day. The pavement was icy and slippery. I limped to school, carefully watching my step so I wouldn’t put too much weight on the malfunctioning foot. But then I slid and I lost balance and….

…SPLAT!

The blister popped as I accidentally landed on the bad foot.

Initially, it hurt a little bit, but after 5 or so minutes, I actually felt fine.

Then, after a couple of days, the blister receded and soon after, I was fine.

By doing the exact opposite of what the doctor told me to do!

Now, I’m not saying that you should defy your doctor’s orders. In fact, you should listen to them for pretty much all the time. Especially instead of me, since I’m not a medical professional. But do keep in mind that doctor’s aren’t ‘special’ people that were sent down from The Heavens to cure you for your pains. They’re just ordinary people carrying out their job, hoping to get paid. In my doctor’s instance, I personally believe he was wrong.

And there are times where a lot of other doctors have been wrong, too.

Whatever your pain issues are, they’re quite likely invisible.

People don’t know how bad it is.

Only you do.

Now, to combat pain issues, a lot of patients have used CBD oil with great success.

I’ll leave the rest up to you.